Is Reconciliation advancing or retreating? Status Updates as of Dec. 31, 2020

Indigenous Watchdog is now completely updated and current as of December 31, 2020

The 36 “Calls to Action” updates below – Legacy and Reconciliation – are a measure of how reconciliation is actually working through the day-to-day actions and policy decisions various levels of government – federal provincial, territory and municipal – and other institutional stakeholders across Canada are making within their own jurisdictions (41% of the total number of 366 updates). These regular “Status Update” reports also continue to identify and document those specific actions and policies that are flagged as “Current Problems and Issues” (44 in this update) that raise significant roadblocks to reconciliation.

The “Current Reality” section (7% of the total) reflects the shifting “reality” of what is happening with reconciliation within specific themes – Child Welfare, Health, Justice, UNDRIP etc. – whereas the “Current Problems and Issues” section, in effect, highlights the more problematic structural issues that persist despite what appears to be progress elsewhere. The challenge is in reconciling the two into a more holistic outcome that recognizes the nation-to-nation bonds established 257 years ago with the Royal Proclamation of 1763 and the Treaty of Niagara between the British crown and sovereign Indigenous Nations were broken by confederation. 153 years later, the Indigenous people of Canada – seven generations – are reclaiming their rightful place in a country called Canada whose roots are inextricably grounded in Indigenous territory.

So what is the challenge and problem of achieving reconciliation?

According to a Nanos poll “Views of Canadians on Indigenous Issues” released by the Assembly of First Nations on Sept.8, 2020, 64% of Canadians either Support or Somewhat Support “Agreement with passing legislation to implement the United Nations Declaration”. The problem is that too many of our elected leaders are still refusing to listen. And by that I mean the premiers and the governments of BC, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador – 9 of the 13 provinces and territories! Indigenous Watchdog lays out all the evidence for you to decide.

Who are the four exceptions?

  • Prince Edward Island which has an Indigenous population of 2,740 (0.2% of the population);
  • Nunavut (85.9% of the population are Inuit governed by the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement and the Nunavut Act)
  • NWT (50.7% of population are First Nations) have a majority Indigenous population
  • Eleven of the fourteen Yukon First Nations have settled their land claims and are self-governing, which account for more than half of all self- governing First Nations in Canada

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission states that the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous peoples is “the framework for reconciliation” that establishes the “minimum standards necessary for the dignity, survival and well-being of Indigenous peoples”. Indigenous Watchdog has documented over the last 11 months the actions of the nine premiers – and all other stakeholders – across all the Calls to Action for which they are each ultimately accountable.

Is Reconciliation advancing or retreating? Read Indigenous Watchdog and find out.

SectionsApr. 21 June 15Aug. 17 Nov. 9 Dec. 31Total%
Current Reality74168267%
Current Problems and Issues223028654418952%
Legacy Calls to Action17131531209626%
Reconciliation Calls to Action77619165515%
TOTAL53545012188366100%
Indigenous Watchdog Status Updates: Feb. 25, 2020 – December 31, 2020
  • Of the 189 “Current Problems and Issues” 59 are updates to the original issue
  • That leaves 130 discrete “Problems and Issues” (42%) across most of the critical “Calls to Action”: Child Welfare, Education, Language and Culture, Health, Justice, UNDRIP, Royal Proclamation and Covenant

Which Calls to Action Have Changed?

Call to ActionDescriptionPrevious StatusCurrent StatusFor details
Call to Action # 18Aboriginal health rightsIN PROGRESSSTALLEDSee C2A # 18
Call to Action # 41MMIWG InquirySTALLEDIN PROGRESSSee C2A # 41
Call to Action # 43UNDRIP legislationSTALLEDIN PROGRESSSee C2A # 43
Call to Action # 44UNDRIP Action PlanNOT STARTEDIN PROGRESSSee C2A # 44
Call to Action # 53National Council for ReconciliationIN PROGRESSSTALLEDSee C2A # 53
Call to Action # 94Oath of CitizenshipSTALLEDIN PROGRESSSee C2A # 94
Click on link above to visit the relevant Call to Action in Indigenous Watchdog

Significant Events

Child Welfare

  • Manitoba passes Bill 2 to legalize the clawback of Children’s Special Allowance from Indigenous children in care (90% in Manitoba) and prohibits First Nations from challenging the law in the courts

Health

  • Release of “In Plain Sight: Addressing Indigenous-specific Racism and Discrimination in B.C. Health Care”. The investigation has found pervasive systemic racism against Indigenous people in this province
  • Release of the Our Health Counts: Thunder Bay an inclusive community-based health survey for Thunder Bay Indigenous peoples and part of the largest Indigenous population health study in Canada
  • Differing views on systemic racism in Québec: Québec government, Assembly of First Nations Québec and Labrador and Joyce’s Principle from the Atikamekw Nation
  • Release of “Joyce’s Principle” with recommendations to eliminate systemic racism in the delivery of Indigenous healthcare
  • Failure of federal government to eliminate long-term Drinking Water Advisories
  • Conservative Government of Saskatchewan unanimously rejecting NDP Suicide Prevention Strategy
  • 24 civil society groups “condemned the obstructive attitude of some governments” in advancing international human rights obligations in Canada especially during the pandemic.

Justice

  • Updates to investigations of the use of force by the RCMP and other police forces in BC, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Québec, New Brunswick, Nunavut
  • Release of “Racism in Québec: ZERO TOLERANCE: Report of the Groupe d’action contre le racism” with its 12 recommendations vs the 142 of the Viens Commission

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People

  • Multiple issues with UN Declaration across multiple jurisdictions: BC, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick
  • A new Legislative Development Protocol from the Intergovernmental Council of the Northwest Territories gives Indigenous governments a seat at the table for decisions about land and resource management – the first agreement of its kind in Canada
  • Moderate Living fishery dispute continues with Sipekne’katik Chief Mike Sack called off negotiations with Department of Fisheries

Business

  • All five Charted Banks of Canada – RBC, BMO, CIBC, Toronto Dominion Bank and Scotiabank – will no longer fund drilling in the arctic including the Arctic Wildlife Refuge

The tables below identify:

  • Which Themes and/or Calls to Action have updated content?
  • Where is the updated content located?
  • Summary description of the specific content

Child Welfare

Child Welfare Home Page
Current Reality
Update to Federal Actions
Nov. 27, 2020 – Federal government announced funding of $542M over 5 years to support the Indigenous Child Welfare Act and support First Nations, Inuit, and Métis engagement to exercise jurisdiction over child and family services and advance the implementation of the Act
Child Welfare Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Child Welfare: Child and Youth Advocates Report
“Are They Listening” Report of Manitoba Child and Youth Advocate
Nov. 13, 2020 – First public compliance report on provincial government’s responses to 23 specific recommendations in four different reports issued in 2018 and 2019: 2 fully implemented, only 43% achieved positive compliance
Nov. 19, 2020 – Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs identified three critical barriers to the implementation of recommendations
Child Welfare Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Child Welfare: Court/Legislative Challenges
Update to “Manitoba government’s clawback of the federal Child Special Allowance from First Nations”
Nov. 6, 2020 – Bill 2 is passed and becomes law
Dec. 15, 2020 – The Southern Chiefs Organization and the Manitoba Métis Federation along with a group of 19 Indigenous child and family Agencies and Authorities filed a constitutional legal challenge against Manitoba’s “Bill 2 Budget Implementation and Tax Statutes Amendment Act.” that legalizes the theft of CSA money from Indigenous children, the most vulnerable group in Manitoba. 
Call to Action # 1
Commit to reducing the number of Aboriginal children in care
Update to “Government Commitments”: BC
Dec. 15, 2020 – BC Representative for Children and Youth released “A Parent’s Duty: Government’s Obligation to Youth Transitioning into Adulthood with specific recommendations for transitional support for First Nations, Métis, Inuit and Urban Indigenous youth, who are 17 times more likely to be in government care in B.C. than non-Indigenous youth.
Call to Action # 4
Enact Indigenous Child Welfare legislation
Update to “Why in Progress?”
Nov. 27, 2020 – Federal government announced funding of $542M over 5 years to support the Indigenous Child Welfare Act and support First Nations, Inuit, and Métis engagement to exercise jurisdiction over child and family services and advance the implementation of the Act

Education

Call to Action # 12
Develop culturally appropriate early childhood education programs
Update to ‘Provincial Commitments to Early Childhood Education”: Manitoba
Dec. 21, 2020 – $530K in funding to community-based organizations – including Wahbung Abinoonjiiag Inc. – serving vulnerable families to ensure qualified child-care providers are available at no cost to parents when seeking supports and services.

Language and Culture

Call to Action # 15
Appoint an Indigenous Language Commissioner
Update to: “Why In Progress?”
Dec. 8, 2020 – The Notice of Appointment Opportunity, which solicits applications to fill the positions of (1) Commissioner and (up to 3) Directors of Indigenous Languages, has been posted on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Health

Health Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Health: COVID-19
24 civil society groups attending the third ever meeting of Federal, Provincial, Territory Ministers responsible for human rights “condemned the obstructive attitude of some governments” in advancing international human rights obligations.
Nov. 12, 2020 – During the past eight months of responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, no government has applied – equitably or otherwise – an explicit economic, social, cultural, and environmental rights framework to analyze the problems laid bare, or to structure solutions.
Health Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Health: COVID-19
COVID-19 statistics don’t reflect the reality for Indigenous people living in Canadian cities
Nov. 19, 2020 – Janet Smylie, research chair in Indigenous health knowledge and information at Well Living House at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto identified three fundamental issues as to why Indigenous COVID-19 statistics are underreported and misleading
Health Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Health: Indigenous Health Surveys
Release of the Our Health Counts: Thunder Bay an inclusive community-based health survey for Thunder Bay Indigenous peoples and part of the largest Indigenous population health study in Canada.
Nov. 30, 2020 – Study highlights the gap in access to culturally safe care for Indigenous peoples within public health, primary health, mental health, acute and long-term care.
Health Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Health: Health Care Reform
Release of “Our Children, Our Future: The Health and Well-being of First Nations Children in Manitoba”  
Dec. 9, 2020 – The purpose of this report is to provide a sound baseline measure of how First Nations children in Manitoba are doing in order to determine if the children’s lives are improving as a result of these calls to action. These findings clearly show that an enormous amount of work is required in virtually every area – health, social, education and justice – to improve First Nations children’s lives
Health Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Health: Systemic racism in Health
Update to “Independent investigation into systemic racism within BC Healthcare System
Dec. 1, 2020 – The independent investigation – touted as the first complete review of racism in a Canadian health-care system – released its report “In Plain Sight: Addressing Indigenous-specific Racism and Discrimination in B.C. Health Care.“ The investigation has found pervasive systemic racism against Indigenous people in the province
Dec. 1, 2020 – The Métis Nations of BC (MNBC) recommends that the Ministry of Health establish a structured senior level health relationship table with MNBC, and direct health authorities to enter into Letters of Understanding with MNBC and Métis Chartered Communities that establish a collaborative relationship with clear and measurable outcomes …establish the BC-Métis Nation Health Leadership Table in the first six months of 2021. MNBC receives minimum funding relative to First Nations ($200K vs $60M)
Health Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Health: Systemic Racism in Health
Updates to “”Death of Joyce Echaquan provides clear evidence of systemic racism in Québec healthcare system
Nov. 10, 2020 – Quebec Government is investing $3.1M in Joliette “to enable the relocation and enlargement of the Centre d’amitié autochtone de Lanaudière (CAAL), an Indigenous community organization whose mission is to improve the living conditions of Indigenous people living in or passing through the Joliette region by providing a number of support services, assistance and information through programs specially designed for Indigenous families.
Nov. 16, 2020 – The Council of the Atikamekw of Manawan (CDAM) and the Council of the Atikamekw Nation (CAN) have submitted a brief for “Joyce’s Principle” to Francis Legault, the Premier of Quebec and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Joyce’s Principle is a call to action and commitment to governments to facilitate the transition towards health and social services systems that are safer and free from discrimination for Indigenous people across Quebec and Canada. Rejected by the Quebec government.
Dec. 15, 2020 – Release of “Racism in Québec: ZERO TOLERANCE: Report of the Groupe d’action contre le racism” by the Québec government that had no Indigenous representation. 12 of the 25 recommendations are specific to Indigenous people vs the 142 Calls to Action of the Viens Commission to address widespread systemic discrimination against Indigenous people throughout all sectors of Quebec society. The Québec government refuses to acknowledge that systemic racism exists in Québec.
Health Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Health: COVID-19
Update to “Indigenous coalition wants BC Government to release proximate COVID-19 information
Dec. 1, 2020 – First Nations leaders feel vindicated by Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond’s report on systemic racism and expect BC’s provincial health officer and Minister of Health, to implement the report’s recommendations immediately, including addressing COVID-19 information sharing. Turpel-Lafond’s report finds pandemic is magnifying racism and disproportionally impacting Indigenous people
Dec. 17, 2020 – BC Information and Privacy Commissioner rejects application by First Nations for release of proximate COVID-19 information
Dec. 17, 2020 – First Nations leaders issued a joint statement in response to the OIPC Commissioner’s ruling
criticizing BC’s colonial system of government that has failed to recognize us as the self-governing nations we are
Health Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Health
Update to “Failure of BC Government to respond to multiple requests from BC First Nations for information and resources to protect them from CPVID-19” (June 24, 2020)
Dec. 15, 2020 – Wet’suwet’en Elders in Witset have identified five COVID-19 cases directly linked “to workers returning from job sites at an LNG Canada plant in Kitimat and the Coastal GasLink pipeline camps closer to home. Hundreds of health and social workers have also signed an open letter to Dr. Bonnie Henry, Provincial Health Officer, expressing concern about the camps.
Call to Action # 18
Recognize and implement healthcare rights of Indigenous peoples
Update to “Why Stalled?” Status changed from “IN PROGRESS” to “STALLED”
Stalled due to ongoing issues in multiple provinces of systemic racism in Indigenous health including health risks associated with infrastructure projects during COVID-19 and the government of Québec’s refusal to adopt Joyce’s Principle
Call to Action # 18
Recognize and implement healthcare rights of Indigenous people
Update to “Federal/Provincial/Territory Recognition of Indigenous Rights to Health”: Ontario
Dec. 17, 2020 – $8 million is funding is dedicated for targeted, culturally safe services for Indigenous peoples, including land-based programming, and culturally safe and age-appropriate mental health and addictions supports, including wellness supports for children and youth.
Call to Action # 18
Recognize and implement healthcare rights of Indigenous people
Update to “Federal/Provincial/Territory Recognition of Indigenous Rights to Health”: Québec
Dec. 8, 2020 – Québec government directly responds to Calls to Justice 20 and 21 from the MMIWG Supplementary Report on Québec by tabling a draft Act to authorize the communication of personal information to the families of Indigenous children who went missing or died after being admitted to an institution.
Call to Action # 18
Recognize and implement healthcare rights of Indigenous people
Update to “Federal/Provincial/Territory Recognition of Indigenous Rights to Health”: Manitoba
Dec. 21, 2020 – An Advisory Committee was established for the development of the draft Indigenous
Partnership Strategy Framework (IPSF) that included seventeen Indigenous members with extensive knowledge in the Indigenous health field. The framework was developed to enable culturally relevant and appropriate engagement with Indigenous organizations and communities in Manitoba’s Health System Transformation.
Call to Action # 19
Establish measurable goals to identify and close health gaps
Update to “Research Investments in Indigenous Health” (Manitoba)
Dec. 21, 2020 – An Advisory Committee was established for the development of the draft Indigenous
Partnership Strategy Framework (IPSF) that included seventeen Indigenous members with extensive knowledge in the Indigenous health field. The framework was developed to enable culturally relevant and appropriate engagement with Indigenous organizations and communities in Manitoba’s Health System Transformation.
Call to Action # 22
Recognize value of Indigenous healing practices and use in healthcare systems
Update to “Integration of Indigenous Healing Practices in Provinces and Territories” (Ontario)
Nov. 16, 2020 – Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto launches an Indigenous-led centre dedicated to improving health-care services for First Nation, Inuit and Métis communities. Shkaabe Makwa, Anishinaabe for “Spirit Bear helper”, “plans to meld Indigenous knowledge and traditions with medical research, training and healing models for caregivers serving Indigenous communities”

Health – Suicide Prevention

Health Home Page – “Suicide Prevention – Home Page”
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Suicides
Update to “Pillars for Life: Saskatchewan’s Suicide Prevention Strategy” fails Indigenous people
Sept. 13, 2020 – Tristan Durocher’s 635 kilometre “Walking With Our Angels” protest march and 44 day ceremonial fast on the lawns of the Saskatchewan legislature to raise awareness about the suicide crisis in northern Saskatchewan has ended. Protest was launched after the Saskatchewan government unanimously rejected the NDP’s “Bill 618 – The Saskatchewan Strategy for Suicide Prevention Act”

Health – Drinking Water Advisories

Health Home Page
Drinking Water Advisories Home Page
Update to “Current Reality”
Dec. 3, 2020 – After 5 years and $1.65B in spending, the Government of Canada will not be successful in eliminating drinking water advisories by March 2021. 59 “long-term drinking water advisories” remain in place, down from 61 in March 2020 and 105 in November 2015
Dec. 3, 2020 – Minister of Indigenous Services, announced more than $1.5 billion in additional investments to accelerate work to lift all long-term drinking water advisories on reserves, and $114.1 million per year ongoing thereafter to support daily operations and maintenance for water infrastructure on reserves.
Health Home Page – Drinking Water Advisories Home Page
Current Reality
Updated Government of Canada Progress Report on Drinking Water Advisories
Dec. 23, 2020 – Latest Government of Canada update indicates 58 Long-Term Drinking Water Advisories are still in effect

Justice

Justice Home Page
Update to Current Reality
Added table updating results of numerous investigations into excessive use of force by RCMP and other acts of systemic racism against Indigenous people
Dec. 31, 2020 – 15 updates: 3 Advance reconciliation; 12 create roadblocks to reconciliation
Justice Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Justice: Systemic Racism in Policing
The RCMP Civilian Review and Complaints Commission issued its Final Report on the RCMP’s actions in managing Indigenous protests over shale-gas exploration in New Brunswick in 2013.
Nov. 12, 2020 – The RCMP indicated that it supported 8 of the Commission’s 12 recommendations, it believed 3 of those required no further action. This concerns the Commission, as these included recommendations concerning roadblocks, exclusion zones and limits to police powers. The Commission made recommendations about these issues because there were concerns about the RCMP’s actions in this case.
Justice Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Justice: Legislative Issues
24 civil society groups attending the third ever meeting of Federal, Provincial, Territory Ministers responsible for human rights “condemned the obstructive attitude of some governments” in advancing international human rights obligations.
Nov. 12, 2020 – Groups had pressed governments to commit to nation-wide law reform….to effectively implementing international human rights obligations in Canada. Québec opposed any references to “systemic” racism in the final communiqué and Alberta stated it is not bound to report on or engage with international instruments or mechanisms to which it is not a Party, a position that contravenes international law.
Justice Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Justice: Systemic Racism in RCMP Policing
19-year-old member of Tataskweyak Cree Nation in northern Manitoba “was knocked unconscious at an RCMP detachment in Thompson, Man., and despite the act being caught on video, no formal investigation was launched.
Nov. 9, 2020 – Issues with lack of supervision of Community Safety Officers; Intoxicated Persons Detention Act is applied to Indigenous people in the north 6x more often than is applied in Winnipeg; multiple RCMP visits to the home of the victim pressuring her to withdraw her complaint
Justice Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Justice: Systemic Racism in RCMP Policing
Delays preventing the release of a civilian watchdog report into RCMP spying on Indigenous and climate advocates” in BC.
Nov. 10, 2020 – BC Civil Liberties Association is launching a lawsuit against RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki “for inexcusable delays” in responding to the RCMP’s Civilian Review and Complaints Commission report submitted to her in June 2017
Justice Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Justice: Court Challenges
Update to “Court Challenges: Reduction of second-degree murder charges to manslaughter and aggravated assault into the death of Barbara Kentner in Thunder Bay, Ontario
Dec. 14, 2020 – Brayden Bushby found guilty of manslaughter.
Justice Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Justice: Systemic Racism in Policing
Update to “The Assembly of First Nations Québec-Labrador announces it is developing its own action plan to address discrimination and racism
Dec. 15, 2020 – Release of “Racism in Québec: ZERO TOLERANCE: Report of the Groupe d’action contre le racism” by the Québec government that had no Indigenous representation. 12 of the 25 recommendations are specific to Indigenous people vs the 142 Calls to Action of the Viens Commission to address widespread systemic discrimination against Indigenous people throughout all sectors of Quebec society. The Quebec government refuses to acknowledge that systemic racism exists in Quebec.
Justice Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Justice: Systemic Racism in RCMP Policing
Update to “Call for an independent investigation into the shooting deaths of two Indigenous people in New Brunswick”
Nov. 16, 2020 – None of the six Wolastoqey Chiefs have heard anything about their request for an independent investigation from Premier Blaine Higgs or Aboriginal Affairs Minister Arlene Dunn in over two months since he won the provincial election
Dec. 16, 2020 – First Nations chiefs have announced that they will not be participating in the “All-Parties Working Group on Truth and Reconciliation” announced by the Province on December 3, 2020. The Premier and Minister Dunn both oppose an independent inquiry into systemic racism and are actively working against the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
Justice Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Justice: Systemic Racism in RCMP Policing
Update to “Excessive use fo force in the RCMP arrest of Athabasca Chipewyan First Nations Chief Allan Adam”
Dec. 3, 2020 – Government of Alberta has issued an online survey that is part of the province’s review of the Police Act. These discussions and the survey responses will guide changes to the Police Act expected for next fall.
Justice Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Justice: Systemic Racism in RCMP Policing
Update to “Entrenched systemic racism against the Inuit by the RCMP in Nunavut
Dec. 3, 2020 – No charges will be laid against the RCMP officer who hit an inebriated Inuit man with the door of his moving truck.
Justice Home Page
Current Problems and Issues in Indigenous Justice: Issues Against Targeted Indigenous Groups
Update to “Indigenous police forces are only police force in Canada not classified as an essential service”
Dec. 8, 2020 – Federal government has again committed to implementing legislation making Indigenous policing an essential service and has committed $1.5M to AFN to start co-developing legislation
Call to Action # 27
Ensure lawyers receive cultural competency and Indigenous rights training
Update to “Provincial Commitments to Indigenous Cultural Competency Training for Lawyers: Alberta”
Nov. 9, 2020 – All lawyers in Alberta will take Indigenous Cultural Competency training starting in early 2021. The new mandate will give lawyers a “base understanding of how Indigenous clients experience the law in Alberta and in Canada.”
Call to Action # 29
Settlement Agreements for those excluded from the TRC process
Update to “Settlements for parties excluded from the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement: St. Anne’s Indian Residential School
Nov. 5, 2020 – Ontario Court of Appeal has ruled that the residential school fight over documents cannot be transferred to BC but must be heard by an Ontario Superior Court judge citing “access to justice considerations”
Nov. 20, 2020 – From Jan. 1, 2013 to Oct. 1, 2020 total legal costs in the case against survivors of St. Anne’s residential school, which was in Fort Albany, Ont., on James Bay, amounts to $3,231,0000.
Call to Action # 29
Settlement Agreements for those excluded from the TRC process
Update to “Settlements for parties excluded from the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement: Newfoundland and Labrador – Mount Cashel Orphanage
Dec. 28, 2020 – Supreme Court will decide in January whether The Archdiocese of St. John’s is liable for physical and sexual abuse suffered by Indigenous claimants at the Mount Cashel Orphanage
Call to Action # 29
Settlement Agreements for those excluded from the TRC process
Update to “Settlements for parties excluded from the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement: Sixties Scoop
Dec. 8, 2020 – A group dedicated to Sixties Scoop survivors (60s Scoop Legacy of Canada) is urging the government and representative law firms to reinstate the deadlines for the First Nations/Inuit Sixties Scoop settlement agreement that were suspended
Call to Action # 31
Provide stable funding to implement alternatives to imprisonment
Update to “Government Commitments to Restorative Justice: Federal”
Nov. 18, 2020 – In recognition of Restorative Justice Week (November 15-22) a total of 12 restorative justice projects are being supported through three programs: Justice Canada’s Indigenous Justice Program, Justice Partnership and Innovation Program and the Youth Justice Fund.
Nov. 30, 2020 – The 2020 Fall Economic Statement included $49.3 million to support the implementation of Gladue Principles in the mainstream justice system and Indigenous-led responses
Call to Action # 33
Develop culturally relevant FASD prevention programs
Update to “General Government Responses to FASD Programs: Manitoba
Dec. 21, 2020 – Developed a comprehensive FASD training package in partnership with numerous FASD service providers. The training package include four modules
Call to Action # 41
Appoint public inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls
Update to “Why IN PROGRESS?” Status Changed from “STALLED to IN PROGRESS”
Dec. 15, 2020 – Federal government announced their ongoing plans to develop and implement a distinctions-based, regionally relevant, and accountable National Action Plan in three years but offered no details other than funding of $35 million over six years and $6 million ongoing for Indigenous consultation
Call to Action # 41
Appoint public inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls
Update to “Provincial and Territory Government Commitments to Reduce Violence Against Indigenous Women: Ontario”
Dec. 10, 2020 – Funding to be used by the Ontario Native Women’s Association (ONWA) to further develop and expand the Aakode’ewin – Courage for Change Program across Ontario, addressing the unique needs of the disproportionate numbers of Indigenous women, youth and girls affected by human trafficking. 
Call to Action # 41
Appoint public inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls
Update to “Provincial and Territory Government Commitments to Reduce Violence Against Indigenous Women: Québec”
Dec. 4, 2020 – Funding to finance a set of measures intended to better adapt police intervention to the realities of Indigenous communities, in particular when it comes to women who are victims of domestic violence or sexual assault.
Call to Action # 42
Commit to recognize and implement Aboriginal Justice Systems
Update to “Federal, Provincial, Territory Commitments to Aboriginal Justice Systems”: Federal
Dec. 15, 2020 – The 2020 Fall Economic Statement included $8.1 million to develop Administration of Justice Agreements with Indigenous communities to strengthen community-based justice systems and support self-determination.

United Nations Declaration (UNDRIP)

United Nations Declaration (UNDRIP) Home Page
Update to “Current Reality”
Introduction of Bill C-15 “An Act respecting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
Dec. 3, 2020: Government of Canada introduced Bill C-15 “An Act respecting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples” for First Reading in the House of Commons over the strong objections of the provincial governments of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Québec and New Brunswick
Dec. 4, 2020 – Added a link to detailed information from the Assembly of First Nations: summary, background, current status, next steps
United Nations Declaration (UNDRIP) Home Page
Update to “Current Reality”
NEW SECTION: Dec. 31 Updates on UNDRIP actions in BC (Nov. 26), Northwest Territories (Dec. 2) and Quebec (Dec. 1) and Ontario (June 11, 2020)
BC – First Nations Leadership Council questions sincerity of government’s UNDRIP legislation after Bill 22 and Bill 17 are passed with no Indigenous consultation
NWT – passes Legislative Development protocol – the first of its kind in Canada – to co-manage land and resource management
Québec – Montréal Economic Institute endorses poll showing 55% of Québecers are opposed to special status for Indigenous people in Québec
Ontario – Bill 76 “The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People Act” is stalled
United Nations Declaration (UNDRIP) Home Page
Current problems and Issues with the United Nations Declaration
Five First Nations in Northern Ontario asked the Impact Assessment Agency of Canada (IAC) to extend the Ring of Fire consultation period due to capacity issues relating to COVID-19. The IAC extended the deadline by one week!
Dec. 17, 2020 – York University professor and Ring of Fire expert Dayna Scott, said it’s a problem. “It shows the audacity of both levels of government here that they think it’s okay to just push these First Nations to the side and continue on with their planning for a region that’s exclusively occupied by Indigenous people.”
United Nations Declaration (UNDRIP) Home Page
Current problems and Issues with the United Nations Declaration
Montreal Economic Institute (MEI) endorses the results of Ipsos poll they commissioned indicating that 55% of Quebecers are opposed to UNDRIP and any special status for Indigenous people in the province
Dec. 9, 2020 – The poll results align with MEI’s own over-all economic agenda in promoting and safeguarding the economic interest of Quebec’s business elite not in righting the historical economic wrongs inflicted on Indigenous peoples
United Nations Declaration (UNDRIP) Home Page
Current problems and Issues with the United Nations Declaration
The provincial governments of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Québec and New Brunswick asked the federal government to postpone tabling Bill C-15 “The UN Declaration” in the House of Commons
Nov. 27, 2020 – The six conservative provinces asked for more time for broader consultation to voice their objections to UNDRIP in particular the perceived “veto” that they believe UNDRIP gives to Indigenous people despite the myriad repeated assertions that the word “veto” is never mentioned in UNDRIP.
United Nations Declaration (UNDRIP) Home Page
Current problems and Issues with the United Nations Declaration
First Nations Leadership Council has raised issues with the BC’s Bill 41, the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act (Declaration Act), passed on November 26, 2019
Nov. 26, 2020 – Bill 22 “Mental Health Amendment Act” and Bill 17 “Clean Energy Amendment Act“, were passed without engaging with First Nations Title and Rights holders and without regard to the detrimental impacts these bills stand to have on First Nations and the rejection of these bills that many First Nations publicly provided
United Nations Declaration (UNDRIP) Home Page
Current problems and Issues with the United Nations Declaration
Update to “Innu Nation of Labrador file lawsuit against Hydro-Quebec for damages resulting from Churchill Falls project
Dec. 3, 2020 – Five First Nations in Québec, the Innu of Pessamit, the Atikamekw of Wemotaci, and the Anishnabeg of Pikogan, Lac Simon and Kitcisakik, have joined the Innu Nation of Labrador to oppose Hydro-Quebec’s massive new power transmission corridor to the United States.
United Nations Declaration (UNDRIP) Home Page
Current problems and Issues with the United Nations Declaration
Update to “Ongoing refusal of federal government to define “Moderate Living” fishery for Mi’kmaw communities
Dec. 10, 2020 – Sipekne’katik Chief Mike Sack called off negotiations with Department of Fisheries after 3 months due to DOF seeking an agreement based on terms and conditions dictated on fishery access derived from statute, instead of a treaty-based fishery where our treaty right to fish and sell is derived from recognized section 35 constitutional rights to harvest and sell fish
Dec. 21, 2020 – The Unified Fisheries Conservation Alliance (UFCA), a newly formed alliance of commercial fishery stakeholders, is calling on the Government of Canada to establish clear, lasting, responsible, regulatory oversight for all fisheries – commercial, food, social, and ceremonial.
United Nations Declaration (UNDRIP) Home Page
Current problems and Issues with the United Nations Declaration
Update to “The Anicinape Nation in Québec is calling for a complete moratorium on moose hunting on its un-ceded ancestral territory”
Nov. 17, 2020 – All parties agreed to immediately begin a negotiation process to find lasting solutions to avoid a repeat of the situation experienced in the fall, during the moose hunting season, in the La Vérendrye Wildlife Reserve.
Call to Action # 43
Fully adopt and implement UNDRIP as the framework for reconciliation
Update to “Why In Progress?” Status Changed from STALLED to IN PROGRESS
Dec. 1, 2020: Government of Canada introduced Bill C-15 “An Act respecting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples” for First Reading in the House of Commons over the strong objections of the provincial governments of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Québec and New Brunswick
Call to Action # 43
Fully adopt and implement UNDRIP as the framework for reconciliation
Update to “Federal, Provincial and Territory Government Commitment to Implement UNDRIP”: Federal
Dec. 3, 2020 – The Government of Canada introduced Bill C-15 “An Act respecting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples” This legislation also responds to the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls’ Calls for Justice.
Call to Action # 43
Fully adopt and implement UNDRIP as the framework for reconciliation
Update to “Federal, Provincial and Territory Government Commitment to Implement UNDRIP”: NWT
Dec. 2, 2020 – The Intergovernmental Council (IGC), comprised of leaders from nine Indigenous Governments and the Government of the Northwest Territories, unanimously agreed to adopt a Legislative Development Protocol that will guide future collaborative work on NWT land and resource legislation. Supports the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples by respecting, consulting and collaborating with Indigenous Governments on land and resource management.
Call to Action # 43
Fully adopt and implement UNDRIP as the framework for reconciliation
NEW SECTION: Assembly of First Nations comparison between UNDRIP Bill C-12 and Bill C-262
Dec. 3, 2020 – AFN legal team member Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond compares the content of the two Bills from a preliminary “Draft” perspective
Call to Action # 43
Fully adopt and implement UNDRIP as the framework for reconciliation
NEW SECTION: Official responses to BILL C-15 from the AFN, the Métis National Council and Inuit Tapariit Kanatami
Dec. 3, 2020 – National Chief Bellegarde said, “The AFN has been given a clear mandate from our Chiefs to advocate for federal legislation that builds on the foundations of Bill C-262 and is every bit as strong as Bill C-262 in its respect for our rights. The bill tabled today meets that test.”
Dec. 30, 2020 – The Assembly of First Nations Annual General Meeting failed to adopt “Resolution 86/2019 Support for Federal Legislation to Create a Framework to Implement the UN Declaration” over a number of objections
Dec. 7, 2020 – Inuit representative institutions already enjoy — effectively — the right to free, prior and informed consent. It’s enshrined in constitutionally protected land-claim agreements, and in Inuit impact and benefit agreements with developers
Dec. 3, 2020 – This is a blueprint for clarity,” said Chartrand. “This is a better example for industry to know … full well when they’re putting their money to something [that] it’s got the backing of not only Indigenous governments, but also the federal, provincial and all parties involved.”
Call to Action # 44
Develop national action plan and strategies to achieve UNDRIP goals
Update to “Why In Progress?” Status changed from “NOT STARTED” to “In PROGRESS”
Dec. 3, 2020 – Bill C-15, “The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People Act” introduced for First Reading in the House of Commons specifies that the National Action Plan must be completed no later than three years after the day on which this section comes into force.

Royal Proclamation and Covenant of Reconciliation

Royal Proclamation and Covenant of Reconciliation Home Page
Current Problems and Issues with the Royal Proclamation and Covenant of Reconciliation
Five First Nations in Northern Ontario asked the Impact Assessment Agency of Canada (IAC) to extend the Ring of Fire consultation period (Nov. 12, 2020 – Jan. 21, 2021) due to capacity issues relating to COVID-19 and local drinking water emergencies including a full scale evacuation. The IAC extended the deadline by one week!
Dec. 17, 2020 – York University professor and Ring of Fire expert Dayna Scott, said it’s a problem. “It shows the audacity of both levels of government here that they think it’s okay to just push these First Nations to the side and continue on with their planning for a region that’s exclusively occupied by Indigenous people.”
Royal Proclamation and Covenant of Reconciliation Home Page
Current Problems and Issues with the Royal Proclamation and Covenant of Reconciliation
Update to “Innu Nation of Labrador file lawsuit against Hydro-Quebec for damages resulting from Churchill Falls project
Dec. 3, 2020 – Five First Nations in Québec, the Innu of Pessamit, the Atikamekw of Wemotaci, and the Anishnabeg of Pikogan, Lac Simon and Kitcisakik, have joined the Innu Nation of Labrador to oppose Hydro-Quebec’s massive new power transmission corridor to the United States.
Royal Proclamation and Covenant of Reconciliation Home Page
Current Problems and Issues with the Royal Proclamation and Covenant of Reconciliation
Update to “Update to “Ongoing refusal of federal government to define “Moderate Living” fishery for Mi’kmaw communities
Dec. 10, 2020 – Sipekne’katik Chief Mike Sack called off negotiations with Department of Fisheries after 3 months due to DOF seeking an agreement based on terms and conditions dictated on fishery access derived from statute, instead of a treaty-based fishery where our treaty right to fish and sell is derived from recognized section 35 constitutional rights to harvest and sell fish
Dec. 21, 2020 – The Unified Fisheries Conservation Alliance (UFCA), a newly formed alliance of commercial fishery stakeholders, is calling on the Government of Canada to establish clear, lasting, responsible, regulatory oversight for all fisheries – commercial, food, social, and ceremonial.
Royal Proclamation and Covenant of Reconciliation Home Page
Current Problems and Issues with the Royal Proclamation and Covenant of Reconciliation
Update to “The Anicinape Nation in Québec is calling for a complete moratorium on moose hunting on its un-ceded ancestral territory”
Nov. 17, 2020 – All parties agreed to immediately begin a negotiation process to find lasting solutions to avoid a repeat of the situation experienced in the fall, during the moose hunting season, in the La Vérendrye Wildlife Reserve.
Call to Action # 46
Develop and sign a Covenant of Reconciliation to advance reconciliation
Update to “Why Stalled?”
Added reference to tabling of Bill C-15 The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People Act

Professional Development and Training for Civil Servants

Call to Action # 57
Provide education to civil servants on Indigenous issues, history and treaties
Update to “Government commitments to Professional Development and Training“: Manitoba
Dec. 21, 2020 – Invested over $110,000 to train public servants on the history of Indigenous peoples including developing a professional workshop “The Path to Reconciliation: A Historic and Contemporary Overview’;

National Council for Reconciliation

Call to Action # 53
Enact legislation to establish a National Council for Reconciliation
Update to “Why Stalled?” Status Change from “IN PROGRESS” to “STALLED”
As of Dec. 31, 2020 the federal government has issued no new announcements on the National Council for Reconciliation since the Interim Board delivered their final report to Minister Bennett on size, scope, composition and mandate of the council on June 12, 2018.
National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation Home Page
Current Reality
Added details on “Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre at UBC” and “Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre” at Algoma University
Call to Action # 77
All archives to collaborate with NCTR on collection of records
Update to “Federal/Provincial/Territory/Municipal Commitments to Provide Records to the National Centre”: Ontario
Nov. 26, 2020 – The Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre at Algoma University is partnering with the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre at UBC to increase access to information about the history of Residential Schools.

Commemoration

Commemoration Home Page
New Section “Current Reality”
5 1/2 years of inactivity in responding to Calls to Action # 81 and # 82 for the installation of residential school monuments. Only Toronto, Winnipeg and Edmonton have initiated any activity
Nov. 16, 2020 – Stephanie Scott, director of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, speaking to the House of Commons heritage committee stated “Ottawa and provincial and territorial governments must build monuments in capital cities across Canada to honour residential-school survivors and their families.”

Sports and Reconciliation

Call to Action # 87
Provide public education to tell national stories of Indigenous athletes
Update to “Commitments to Public Education on History of Indigenous Athletes“: Manitoba
Dec. 21, 2020 – The current Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame exhibit includes celebrating 40 years of inductions and features 500+ individuals and teams since 1980 that also include Indigenous members photos on the Hall of Fame wall
Call to Action # 88
Ensure long-term Indigenous athlete development, support for North American Indian Games
Update to “Why In Progress?”
Dec. 18, 2020 – North American Indigenous Games have been postponed for the second time until 2022
Call to Action # 88
Ensure long-term Indigenous athlete development, support for North American Indian Games
Update to “Government Commitments to North American Indigenous Games“: Manitoba
Dec. 21, 2020 – Provided funding support for the North American Indigenous Games (NAIG) Operations Coordinator and preparation for Team Manitoba to participate in NAIG games
Call to Action # 90
Ensure national sports policies and programs are inclusive
Update to “Government and Sports Organizations Commitments to Aboriginal Sports”: Manitoba
Nov. 23, 2020 – Manitoba Aboriginal Sports & Recreation Council announces its revival of the Manitoba Indigenous Games (MIG) last hosted in 2011
Dec. 21, 2020 – Provided ongoing funding support to Manitoba Aboriginal Sports & Recreation Council for various Indigenous awareness/education growth initiatives

Business and Reconciliation

Business and Reconciliation Home Page
Current Problems and Issues: Legislative and Institutional Barriers…
Update to “Department of Fisheries and Oceans supports fish farming at expense of commercial salmon fishery”Legislative and Institutional Barriers“.
Dec. 17, 2020 – The Department of Fisheries and Oceans has ordered the phase out of all 19 Atlantic salmon feedlots owned by Norwegian-based companies. All the farms are to be emptied of Atlantic salmon by June 30, 2021.
Business and Reconciliation Home Page
Current Problems and Issues: Individual Business Issues
Update to ” Bg-5 Canadian Banks continuing to finance oil and gas exploration in the Arctic including the Arctic Wildlife Refuge”.
Dec. 16, 2020 – Scotiabank is the last of Big 5 banks to refuse any funding for drilling in the arctic and the Arctic Wildlife Refuge after similar commitments from BMO, RBC, CIBC and Toronto Dominion Bank
Call to Action # 92
Adopt UNDRIP as a reconciliation framework, apply to policy and operations
Update to “Indigenous Business Organizations: Canadian Council of Aboriginal Business
Dec. 11, 2020 – Summary of CCAB “Submission to the House of Commons’ Standing Committee on International Trade” proposes how Indigenous economic recovery would include set-asides and a navigator function of CanExport programming for Indigenous businesses and communities.
Call to Action # 92
Adopt UNDRIP as a reconciliation framework, apply to policy and operations
Update to “Indigenous Business Organizations: Canadian Council of Aboriginal Business
Sept. 16, 2020 – Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB) and Sodexo Canada released a report summarizing the CCAB Business Recovery Forum – a first of its kind virtual event held on September 16, 2020. Over 600 participants attended the event.

Newcomers to Canada

Call to Action # 94
Replace the Oath of Citizenship with a new oath with Indigenous content
Update to “Why In Progress” Status Changed from “STALLED” to “IN PROGRESS”
Oct. 22, 2020 – Bill 99 “An Act to Amend the Citizenship Act” re-introduced in the House of Commons

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