Business and Reconciliationrb

Federal Government for failure to increase federal procurement spending with Aboriginal business from current spending level of 0.32%

Why?
May 9, 2019 – According to the Treasury Board of Canada, federal government procurement spending totaled $14.6 billion
in 2017. Federal procurement spending through the Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business (PSAB) has accounted for an average of less than 1% (0.32%) of total annual federal procurement spending since 1996.
Comment
Canadian Council of Aboriginal Business released “Industry and Inclusion: An Analysis of Indigenous Potential in Federal Supply Chains” calling on the federal government to increase the dollar value of its procurement spending with Aboriginal businesses to 5% of total procurement spending by 2024. The report found there is surplus Aboriginal business capacity to meet the needs of government and that a 5% target, which reflects the Indigenous population in Canada, is “realistic and achievable.”
Potential Solution
CCAB Industry and Inclusion Recommendations
·       Set a government-wide Indigenous procurement target of 5% within five years, through a 1 percentage point increase annually. Each federal department and agency should lay out a strategy to achieve this target and report annually on progress
·       Require that all departments incorporate considerations of Indigenous peoples (business and community) analogous to the requirements for gender-based analysis for submissions to Treasury Board
·       Develop additional programs to support existing Aboriginal suppliers in department purchase categories where there is currently insufficient Aboriginal business capacity to supply
·       Conduct additional research to identify key barriers to Indigenous business participation in federal supply chains, both from the perspective of Aboriginal business and government procurement officers
https://www.ccab.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Industry-and-Inclusion_-An-Analysis-of-Indigenous-Potential-in-Federal-Supply-Chains-Brief_FINAL.pdf

Government of Ontario for repealing “The Far North Act” which decreases First Nations rights

Why?
Apr. 17, 2019 – Repeal of the “Far North Act“ to reduce restrictions on projects like all-season roads, electrical transmission projects and development of the Ring of Fire “doesn’t do enough to protect the rights of First Nations and will likely lead to “renewed conflict” with Indigenous communities, according to Dayna Scott, an associate professor at Osgoode Hall and a co-director of the law school’s environmental justice and sustainability clinic.
Comment
Scott states, “What the government is proposing to replace it with — largely the Public Lands Act — is “even worse in terms of giving communities the power to make decisions about land uses in their territories.” 
“For Industry and government, our Indigenous laws, title and rights are just more red tape.” “Repeal your laws but respect our laws,
Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug (K.I.) Chief Donny Morris
Potential Solution

Government of Canada for failure to remove barriers to accessing capital in The Indian Act

Why?
Legislative and Regulatory barriers in the Indian Act restrict access to capital to allow indigenous entrepreneurs to develop business opportunities
Comment
Potential Solution
Evening the Odds: Giving Indigenous ventures access to the full financial toolkit”. Dominique Collin and Michael L. Rice 
McDonald-Laurier Institute. (The authors of this document have worked independently and are solely responsible for the views presented here. The opinions are not necessarily those of the Macdonald-Laurier Institute, its Directors or Supporters.) 
·       Continue to expand investments in and support for Aboriginal Financial Institutions (AFIs);
·       Make a substantive effort to renew the fiscal relationship and to make fiscal fairness and affordable borrowing a reality for Indigenous peoples and communities. This includes addressing current legal and regulatory barriers to accessing capital. Indian Act restrictions on land ownership and restrictions on accessing the funds in Indigenous trusts are areas for reform. New and alternative lending options are needed;
·       Indian and Northern Affairs Canada should continue to work with Indigenous peoples, nations and governments to expand investments in communities and to enhance the investment climate. Future economic development programming should emulate the approach that led to the creation of the Native Economic Development Program (NEDP) in the mid-1980s. An area of particular concern is a requirement for community guarantees for private home ownership, a liability no other local order of government in Canada could shoulder alone. These requirements result in individuals’ access to housing being contingent on the financial health and fortune of their community.
·       Enhance the relevance, quality and availability of information to Indigenous households, businesses and communities through a commitment to transparency and openness, as well as supporting Indigenous-led research and data governance.
http://macdonaldlaurier.ca/files/pdf/MLI_IndigenousCapital_F.pdf

Manitoba Government for cutting funding to the Métis Economic Development Fund by more than $1M

Why?
Mar. 14, 2018 – Manitoba earmarked and then cut funding that directly contributes to the economic growth of Manitoba. More than $1 million was cut from the 17/18 budget, leaving a negative impact on the Metis Nation and the development of the Manitoba economy.
Comment
The Metis Economic Development Fund (MEDF) will be operating without a funding agreement as of April 1. “The success stories coming out of MEDF are examples of how investments in the Metis Nation are paying off in areas like job creation and tax revenue generation,” said President Chartrand. 
Potential Solution
The Metis Economic Development Fund an affiliate of the Manitoba Metis Federation, has been working with Metis owned and operated businesses to grow and develop their businesses

Corporate Canada for ongoing failure to capitalize on the emerging business potential of rapidly evolving Indigenous economic opportunities

Why?
85 percent of Canadian businesses are not engaged with Indigenous communities according to a recent survey commissioned by Indigenous Works even though they are the fastest growing demographic in the country according to Statistics Canada.
Comment
If Indigenous peoples were given the same access to economic opportunities available to other Canadians, the resulting increase in employment would result in an additional $6.9 billion per year in employment income and approximately 135,000 newly employed Indigenous people.
Potential Solution
Through a shift in legal influence, today Indigenous peoples own masses of land and entitlements through Treaties and Aboriginal Right and Title and operate space in all areas of business, industries and the private sectors. This will impact and inform important public policy and evolve Indigenous governance structures. With this growth, Indigenous Peoples are increasingly leaving their economic footprint on todays national economic landscape. The Indigenomics Institute is currently unleashing a national Indigenous economic agenda to facilitate the growth of the Indigenous economy from its current value of 32 billion to 100 billion in five years. (TD Special Report)

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