CommitmentRB

Government of Ontario for burying issues fundamental to First Nations in omnibus legislation unrelated to First Nations (i.e Bill 132 “Better for People, Smarter for Business Act, 2019” that undermines Duty to Consult

Why?
Nov. 14, 2019 – First Nation leaders from across Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) have strongly opposed Bill 132 “Better for People, Smarter for Business Act, 2019”, as it seriously undermines the mining industry obligation to consult with First Nation communities. They have also rejected the disrespectful approach of this government of burying issues fundamental to First Nations in omnibus legislation and creating unreasonable timelines to undermine the right of our communities to adequately respond.”
Comment
First Nation leaders have declared their resolve to assert their rights and jurisdiction over their traditional lands by rejecting omnibus legislation being fast-tracked by the provincial government, and controlling development in the Far North. NAN Chiefs have declared that the area designated by Ontario as the ‘Far North’ is subject to the James Bay Treaty No. 9 and Ontario portion of Treaty No. 5, and that development in these lands will not be unilaterally imposed.
Possible Solution
With respect to Bill 132, NAN looks to Ontario to extend the time for consultation and accommodation in respect of the Bill and create a respectful process for engagement. NAN will also request that Ontario end the disrespectful legislative practice of burying issues important to First Nations in omnibus legislation completely unrelated to First Nation matters.

Governments of Canada and Manitoba for cutting off emergency aid to Lake St. Martin First Nation and forcing them back to their home community before housing has been completed.

Why?
Nov. 7, 2019 – announcement by the Government of Canada to cut off funding for emergency aid to residents of Lake St. Martin First Nation in Manitoba on Dec. 31, 2019 with the expectation that new housing stock – needed due to the massive 2011 flood – will be finished by then to accommodate all evacuees. Lake St. Martin Chief Adrian Sinclair says a recent storm, and other factors have delayed the completion of houses on the First Nation.
Comment
When a massive flood hit Manitoba, the Government of Manitoba decided to divert water to Lake St. Martin in order to protect cottage, and agricultural properties on other bodies of water.  As a result, all the housing at Lake St. Martin First Nation was destroyed. As of 2014, the approximately 1,900 flood evacuees are still displaced (Wikipedia). 
Nov. 6, 2019 – While some have returned to newly constructed houses, 991 people are still waiting for a place to live, 400 of them children. (CTV)

Government of Canada lack of commitment to developing a comprehensive Arctic policy

Why?
July 26, 2019 – Failure to take a leadership role in positioning the Canadian arctic for success in a rapidly evolving arctic political landscape. “As the effects of climate change increase access to the Arctic, the global geopolitical context for the region is changing. With enormous untapped opportunities for shipping, research and resource development, many countries are looking to pursue their own national interests in the region, including economic and security interests.
Comment
Canada has no guarantee that the interests of these other state actors coincide with its own interests and priorities. Nor can we be certain that existing rules, agreements and international institutions are still up to the task of reconciling and settling competing interests in the Arctic space – in what is effectively Canada’s own backyard.” Toward a Plan – Strengthening Canada’s Position in the Arctic”. Keynote Vision Address: Bob Mcleod
https://www.gov.nt.ca/en/newsroom/bob-mcleod-toward-plan-strengthening-canadas-position-arctic
Potential Solution
Premier Bob Mcleod of the Northwest Territories believes our national plan needs to be built on three elements: 
·       leveraging the geographic advantage represented by the three territories
·       ramping up Canada’s northern presence, and 
·       increasing Canada’s knowledge about the north.
He also thinks it is important that the residents of Canada’s three Northern territories, including its Indigenous residents… have a leading say in determining Canada’s plan for the Arctic. We are the ones who live there. We are the ones who are repeatedly affected when decisions are made for us, rather than with us. We are an obvious partner when discussions about what happens next take place. Considering that the Canadian Arctic links across the Arctic Ocean to Russia, Finland, Norway, Iceland, Greenland and the United States, we should be the major player with the ability to decisively set the terms for the Arctic — but only if we make a concerted and deliberate effort to build on the advantages we already have in our three Northern territories.

The Council of The Federation, bi-annual meetings of the Federal, Provincial and Territory Premiers for excluding Indigenous leaders from discussions on climate change

Why?
July 11, 2019 – Refusal to allow leaders of the Assembly of First Nations, the Métis National Council, the Inuit Tapariit Kanatami and the Native Woman’s Association of Canada to participate in the main body of meetings with a primary focus on climate change within each jurisdiction. As has been noted by numerous media, Indigenous peoples are on the frontlines of climate change, especially in the north. 
Comment
Multiple articles in UNDRIP explicitly address the rights of Indigenous peoples “to free, prior and informed consent before adopting and implementing legislative or administrative measures that may affect them” (Article 19) as well other fundamental rights relating to treaties and land claims, spiritual relationship “to lands, territories, waters and coastal seas and other resources (Article 25)”,and “the right to the conservation and protection of the environment and the productive capacity of their lands or territories and resources (Article 29). Articles 1, 18, 19, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 32, 37, 40, 42, 46
https://www.un.org/development/desa/indigenouspeoples/wp-content/uploads/sites/19/2018/11/UNDRIP_E_web.pdf
Potential Solution
Fully and completely honor the commitment to UNDRIP specifically and “Reconciliation” in general. Develop and implement the logistical framework and protocols to allow the leadership of the designated national Indigenous organizations – AFN, Métis National Council, Inuit Tapariit Kanatami and Native Women’s Association of Canada) to participate in all agenda items that directly impact Indigenous peoples.

Federal, Provincial and Territory governments for ongoing failure to reduce poverty levels among Indigenous children

Why?
July 9, 2019 – Failure to reduce the level of poverty among Indigenous children. Tracking Indigenous child poverty and non-Indigenous child poverty trends between Census 2006 and Census 2016, it’s clear that these differences have not markedly changed over that 10-year period. 
Comment
Towards Justice: Tackling Indigenous Child Poverty in Canada” co-authored by the Assembly of First Nations (AFN), the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) and published by Upstream: Institute for a Healthy Society says First Nations children experience the highest levels of poverty in Canada.
https://www.afn.ca/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Upstream_report_final_English_June-24-2019.pdf
Potential Solution

The following straightforward recommendations should be included in the federal government’s poverty reduction plan: 

  • Low-income lines, including the Market Basket Measure (MBM) and the after-tax Low Income Measure (LIM-AT), should be applied on reserves and in the territories; 
  • Reserves, conditional upon the agreement of First Nations governments, should be included in annual income surveys, as has already begun to occur in the territories; 
  • The federal government should commit to a 20% reduction in MBM poverty on reserves between 2015 and 2020 and 50% reduction between 2015 and 2030.16 This is in line with the national goals, but should be evaluated separately for reserves; 

The federal government should commit to supporting self-determination, both financially and jurisdictionally, with an emphasis on revenue sharing. 

Arctic Council Ministerial Meeting (Inuit Circumpolar Council ICC) for refusing for the first time to include the views of the permanent Indigenous organizations in their Final Declaration that refused to include language on climate change

Why?
May 7, 2019 – For the first time, the final declaration of the Ministers of the 8 countries that make up the ICC did not include the views of the Arctic Council’s permanent Indigenous organizations, Unlike the usual declarations, which are developed with their input, the compromise joint ministerial statement – which did not include any reference to “climate change” at the insistence of the United States – was put together without them.
Comment
The ICC, which represents 165,000 Inuit in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Chukotka, Russia, blasted the U.S. for torpedoing the Rovaniemi Declaration at Tuesday’s Arctic Council ministerial after refusing to sign on if the words “climate change” were included in the joint document.
James Stotts, ICC’s Alaska president, said sidelining Indigenous contributions and views was a dangerous precedent for the Arctic Council, a forum that has long prided itself for including Arctic Indigenous groups since its founding.
Potential Solution

Government of Manitoba for cancelling the provinces support for self-government of the Manitoba Métis Federation (MMF)

Why?
April 17, 2019 – The Manitoba Métis Federation (MMF) received a letter from the Pallister government cancelling the province’s support for self-government negotiations between Manitoba, Canada, and the MMF. This cancellation is one of several such notices sent from the province in the last year to the Manitoba Métis Government, the MMF.
Comment
Since 1987, the Federal Government of Canada, the Province of Manitoba, and the Manitoba Métis Government have been working through the tripartite negotiation process. Pallister’s recent decision to cut the support represents a significant shift from the long-standing process that ensured an avenue for government-to-government conversations between the Manitoba Métis and the two levels of government. “They have no interest in the rights of the Métis People.
“They have no respect for the Métis Nation as rights-bearing Aboriginal People. There is no relationship between the province and the MMF”. MMF President David Chartrand
Potential Solution

Federal Government for delay in funding the National Council for Reconciliation until the 2020 budget year

Why?
Mar. 19, 2019 – Deferring the budget decision to fund the National Council for Reconciliation until AFTER the next election.  The Interim Board of Directors appointed in Dec. 2017 submitted their interim report to Carolyn Bennett, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs on June 12, 2018, 
Comment
The 2020 fiscal year beginning April 1, 2020 will be almost five years since the TRC Summary Report was issued on June 2, 2015 and almost 2 years since the National Council interim board submitted their report on June 2018 with detailed recommendations on mandate, scope, budget, reporting, governance etc. This will be the third government since the TRC Summary Report was issued: Stephen Harper and Justin Trudeau twice.
Potential Solution

Federal Government for firing Minister of Justice and Attorney-General of Canada Jody Wilson Raybould for refusing to grant SNC Lavalin a Deferred Prosecution Agreement

Why?
Feb. 28, 2019 – Firing Minister of Justice and Attorney-General of Canada Jody Wilson-Raybould for refusing to grant SNC-Lavalin a “Deferred Prosecution Agreement”. As she stated in her testimony to the Justice Committee: “I was taught to always hold true to your core values, principles and to act with integrity…I am a truth teller in accordance with the laws and traditions of our Big House”.
Comment
The history of Crown-Indigenous relations in this country, includes a history of the rule of law not being respected…And I have seen the negative impacts for freedom, equality and a just society this can have first-hand.” Jody Wilson-Raybould.
For more than 150 years Canada has bent laws, disrespected treaties, spent millions taking First Nations to court over resource sharing and tried to bully communities into pipelines.” Tanya Talaga. Toronto Star. March 1, 2019
Potential Solution
Ensuring that the Ministry of Justice and Attorney-General of Canada has complete independence from political interference in prosecutorial decisions

Federal Government and the Government of Nunavut for underinvesting in the territory given its consistent – and forecasted – 5% annual GDP growth since 1999

Why?
Feb. 20, 2019 – The Nunavut Finance Minister has presented a budget that is virtually the same as previous years, an indication that the Government of Canada is continuing to underinvest in the Territory. The Territory’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has grown approximately by five percent annually since 1999 and growth in the economy is expected to remain growing by that margin into 2026. (CBC)
Comment
During the Territory’s healthy economic growth we have continued to see statistics indicate declining quality in health among Nunavut Inuit. It appears the Government of Nunavut budget continues to have a focus on balancing budgets as opposed to meeting the needs of Inuit in the areas of education, training, health and housing.
Potential Solution

Federal Government and Government of BC for RCMP raid against peaceful Gidimt’en protest camp on unceded Wet’suwet’en territory

Why?
Jan. 7, 2019 – RCMP raid against the peaceful Gidimt’en protest camp and checkpoint in northern B.C. – set up in support of the Unist’ot’en, both of which are houses of the Wet’suwet’en Nation – in protest against the TransCanada Coastal GasLink project running through un-ceded Wet’suwet’en territory. 14 people were arrested.
Comment
“Canada and the B.C. government have both pledged to implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, but are trying to impose their laws over Wet’suwet’en laws. If this was really about the ‘rule of law’ then governments would be honouring the rights and title of First Nations in their traditional territories, which are recognized by Canada’s own courts. The AFN supports the governance and decision-making process of the Wet’suwet’en leaders. Canada and B.C. should do the same. There is no reconciliation in the actions that unfolded yesterday.” AFN National Chief, Perry Bellegarde
Potential Solution
“There are not a lot of similarities between the Broughton and the Unist’ot’en engagement with the Province (as stated by Premier John  Horgan). In June, government-to-government work between our three Nations and the Province was confirmed in a letter of understanding (LOU) formalizing ongoing talks regarding salmon aquaculture in the Broughton Archipelago. Importantly, this was a jointly developed consent-based process where our Title and Rights were recognized and as a result, we included our hereditary leadership in decision-making on outcomes. That’s an extremely important distinction because for us, that’s how we respected Delgamuukw and the wishes of our people. The Province also followed its own decision-making process. There was space in the process to revisit any Tenure decisions that weren’t jointly accepted. I’m confident that we would not have reached a point of RCMP action at Gitimd’en if a jointly designed, consent-based process had been in place.” Chief Bob Chamberlin of the Kwikwasutinuxw Haxwa’mis First Nation

RCMP for denial of Aboriginal title and asserting their sole jurisdiction over un-ceded Indigenous land

Why?
Jan. 6, 2019 – A recent RCMP news release (2019/01/06) regarding the enforcement of an interim BC Supreme Court injunction order against the protestors at the Coastal GasLink project, stated: “The Supreme Court of Canada decided that a new trial was required to determine whether Aboriginal title had been established for these lands, and to hear from other Indigenous nations which have a stake in the territory claimed. The new trial has never been held, meaning that Aboriginal title to this land, and which Indigenous nation holds it, has not been determined. Regardless of the outcome of any such trial in the future, the RCMP is the police agency with jurisdiction.” 
Comment
The BC Assembly of First Nations (BCAFN) is very concerned that the RCMP are questioning the ownership of Aboriginal title, and they continue to assume jurisdiction for policing in un-ceded First Nations territories. This is a major problem which requires political intervention from both Prime Minister Trudeau and Premier Horgan in order to protect the advances that have been made in the reconciliation process. The RCMP cannot be allowed to hold discretion or discuss the legal interests and rights of First Nations peoples in BC.” First Nations in BC have unique governance systems and authorities that have existed before colonization, and they continue today. These rights are protected under the Canadian law and are recognized under international law. First Nations Summit Task Group member Grand Chief Ed John said: “We take issue with the erroneous statement made by the RCMP about Aboriginal title.
Potential Solution
The Coastal GasLink project is one that is broadly supported by First Nations governments in BC, and there exists solutions to resolve everyone’s concerns. First Nations in BC have unique governance systems and authorities that have existed before colonization, and they continue today. “First Nations Chiefs in BC are seeking resolution to the land question. Premier Horgan and Prime Minister Trudeau must intensify their reconciliation work in 2019 as progress will require leadership and courage. Let’s get to solutions between the Crown and First Nations regarding jurisdiction and legal orders otherwise we’ll see our volatile history repeated yet again,” stated BC Assembly of First Nations (BCAFN) Regional Chief Teegee.

Federal Government for failure of their Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Framework

Why?
Dec. 4-6, 2018 – AFN Special Chiefs Assembly, Resolution # 25 / 2018 “Rejection of the Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Framework and Associated Processes. The Framework and associated processes undermine the true Nation-to-Nation relationship between First Nations and Canada: 
Comment
Reasons for rejection:
1.      Openly reject Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC) as a guiding principle of the relationship between Canada and First Nations. This is made evident by Principles Respecting the Government of Canada’s Relationship with Indigenous Peoples (Ten Principles) document which states that Canada will only attempt to honour FPIC. This amounts to little more than consultation. 
2.      Call for the infringement of inherent and unextinguished rights and jurisdictions of First Nations. The Ten Principles document clearly states that infringement of Aboriginal rights will continue unabated in situations where Canadian courts find it “justified” or where it is found to be in the best interest of the nation. 
3.      Assert that the Canadian constitutional framework is the only vehicle for the exercise of inherent rights by First Nations. 
Potential Solution
1.      Confirm that only First Nations can determine the path to decolonization. 
2.      Reject Canada’s Principles Respecting the Government of Canada’s Relationship with Indigenous Peoples (Ten Principles) as the basis of the relationship going forward. Joint principles of understanding must be developed in partnership with First Nations and be enshrined in a new Royal Proclamation. 
3.      Reject the Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Framework (the Framework) and will take all necessary steps to prevent the passing of any legislation related to the Framework created by the federal government. There have been no meaningful changes to the Framework process since it was announced in February 2018, despite widespread criticism and outright rejection from First Nations across the country. Unilaterally developed policy and legislation that sets the parameters of Canada’s relationship with First Nations is in direct contravention of the nation-to-nation relationship and Canada’s obligations under international law. 
4.      Call on the Assembly of First Nations to support First Nations in developing their own nation-building processes, including law-making, institution-building, and research of traditional governance systems. It is imperative that First Nations begin developing standards of governance and law-making and begin to assert their inherent rights and unextinguished jurisdictions outside the purview of Canadian legislative control.
https://www.afn.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/2018-Dec-SCA-Resolutions-Package-v3.pdf

Government of Ontario for repealing the Provincial Advocate for Child and Youth Act, 2007

Why?
Nov. 15, 2018 – Progressive Conservative government announced as part of its Fall Economic Outlook that they would be repealing the Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth Act, 2007,and transferring investigation authority into child welfare services, residential care (including youth justice) and children’s secure treatment to the Ombudsman’s Office. 
30% of child welfare caseload in Ontario is Indigenous despite comprising only 4.1% of the population.
Comment
Many of the provisions in the Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth, 2007, will not be carried over to the Ombudsman’s Office. These include, but are not limited to: 
1.    broadening the Ombudsman’s investigation mandate to include all children and youth currently served within our mandate; 
2.    the power to investigate or be notified of incidents of serious occurrences, such as when a young person dies or suffers serious bodily harm; and 
3.    the responsibility to provide rights education to children and youth seeking or receiving services.
Letter from the Provincial Advocate for Children. Mar. 13, 2019
Potential Solution

Federal Government for failure to ensure that the Federal Child Tax Benefit is distributed to ALL Indigenous families who qualify

Why?
July 20, 2018 – (CBC) Failure to ensure that thousands of Indigenous families living on-reserve – among the most impoverished in the country and one with fastest growing demographic in the country – receive the Federal Child Benefit that all Canadians take for granted.
Comment
Take-up rates for families on-reserve have consistently lagged behind the wider population – largely chalked up to lower tax filing rates among Indigenous families. Tax returns are the basis for calculating how much a family receives under the Canada Child Benefit. Two years ago 50% did not receive the benefit; now 20% still do not receive the benefit even though they qualify.
Potential Solution
Establish a more effective process to ensure that all families living on reserve or in isolated communities receive this benefit that is

Province of Ontario for cancelling new updated Sex Ed curriculum in favour of outdated 1998 curriculum

Why?
July 11, 2018 – Cancelled modernized 2015 Sex Ed curriculum in favor of the 1998 curriculum that does not deal with issues such as gender identity, consent, cyber-safety, online bullying and sexting.  The older curriculum disadvantages Indigenous youth who quite often do not have the same social and emotional supports that non-Indigenous youth have access to. CBC
Comment
Oct. 25, 2018 – Grand Council Treaty Three granted intervenor status will argue that Indigenous students are uniquely vulnerable because they suffer higher rates of sexual abuse and violence than other Canadian youth. It will also argue that Indigenous students rely on the up-to-date curriculum more than non-Indigenous students for accurate information about sexual health and relationships. (CBC)
Potential Solution

Government of Ontario for cancelling K-12 curriculum writing sessions to integrate Indigenous content and refusal to make K-12 Indigenous curriculum revisions mandatory

Why?
July 6, 2018 – Ontario’s Ministry of Education has cancelled a project to update provincial curriculum documents with Indigenous content. including those on TRC curriculum revisions and Indigenous languages in kindergarten. Ontario is the only province to renege on its commitment. See Education C2A # 62i
Comment
Doug Ford continues to undo the work of his predecessor, Kathleen Wynne, who initiated a number of positive reforms to advance Reconciliation with First Nations, Métis and Inuit. Indigenous stakeholder groups in Ontario have raised objections to this unilateral and unjustified dismantling of Reconciliation efforts especially given the positive momentum generated in other provinces and territories.
Potential Solution

Government of Ontario for eliminating cabinet role of Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation

Why?
June 29, 2018 – Eliminating a dedicated cabinet position for Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation and subsuming all responsibilities under one Ministry responsible for energy, northern development ad mines, and Indigenous Affairs
Comment
June 29, 2018 – The Ipperwash Inquiry into the police killing of protester Dudley George in an Indigenous occupation of a provincial park in 1995 concluded that divided attention was dangerous — that Native Affairs, as it then was, should be its own ministry. (Ottawa Citizen)
Potential Solution

Government of Quebec for failure to recognize First Nations Aboriginal and Treaty Rights

Why?
April 20, 2018 – In response to the decision of the Quebec Superior Court to uphold the Act respecting the exercise of the fundamental rights and prerogatives of the Québec people and the Québec State (Bill 99), the Assembly of First Nations Quebec-Labrador (AFNQL) totally rejects the very foundations of the Quebec provincial government’s claims contained in Bill 99.
Comment
“It is ironic that, 18 years after claiming its right to self-determination in Bill 99, Quebec, which speaks of its ability to take control of its future, has made no progress in recognizing First Nations Aboriginal and Treaty Rights. Demanding for yourself what you deny to others is absurd,” says Ghislain Picard, Chief of the AFNQL, who is not surprised that Indigenous issues are not considered.…Whatever they say, whatever they do, the cultures, values and philosophies of our peoples were and are fundamentally different from anything that characterizes Quebec’s dominant society. Let us be clear and say it like it is: I am not Canadian, I am not a Quebecer, I am Innu. AFNQL Chief Ghislain Picard on October 25, 2006.
Potential Solution

Government of Manitoba for refusing to invite the Manitoba Métis Federation to develop a provincial mineral development protocol

Why?
Mar. 5, 2018 – Refusing to invite the Manitoba Métis Federation (MMF) to comprehensive discussions to develop a provincial mineral development protocol to advance mineral development opportunities and projects on Indigenous territories
Comment
This Provincial Government continues to disrespect the Métis Nation’s claims, rights and interests,” added President Chart and. “Here is a clear example that the mining impacts on the Métis people – social, economic, and environmental – do not matter to this government.” “Manitoba is still using obsolete 1960s policies and they believe they can do whatever they want to the Métis Nation. 
Potential Solution

Government of Manitoba for refusing to attend the first ever Métis Nation Health Forum

Why?
Feb. 26, 2018 – Manitoba Métis Federation (MMF) is frustrated and disappointed by the lack of representation from the Province of Manitoba at a national Métis Nation Health Forum and the message that sends to the Métis Nation.
Comment
A first ever Metis Nation Health Forum was held in Ottawa on February 26, 2018. The Forum brought together over one hundred participants including Métis Nation leaders, officials and staff, government guests from a range of departments and agencies and other health collaborators. Part of the discussion included a review of the MMF-commissioned report Profile of Métis Health Status and Healthcare Utilization in Manitoba: A Population-Based Study. The report was created in 2010 to identify the key health issues facing Manitoba’s Métis Citizens.
Potential Solution

Federal Government for failure to honour agreement to negotiate with the Invialuit Regional Corporation and the government of the NWT over shared management of oil and gas resources in the Beaufort Sea

Why?
Dec. 19, 2017 – Failure to honor agreement with the Government of the Northwest Territories (GNWT) and five regional Indigenous governments to transfer administration and control of public lands and resources to the people who live there. As part of that Agreement, the Government committed to enter into negotiations with the Inuvialuit Regional Corporation (IRC) over the shared management of oil and gas resources in the Beaufort Sea within 60 days of the signing of the Devolution Agreement.
Comment
The federal government did not consult either of our governments about the unilateral decision to impose an indefinite moratorium on offshore oil and gas activity in the Arctic on December 20, 2016 when it has already acknowledged their legitimate rights to be involved in management of these resources in the Devolution Agreement. The GNWT has also provided federal officials – at its request – a written Statement of its interests in the offshore in 2014, but has received no response to date.
Potential Solution

Governments of Canada and Nunavut for keeping local Inuit underemployed at lower pay scales within federal and territorial departments than non-Inuit

Why?
Sept. 12, 2017 – A full set of Inuit employment plans with targets and timelines for expanded Inuit employment were supposed to have been completed for each federal and territorial department by 1996. The Nunavut Inuit Labor Force Analysis (NILFA) report issued on Aug. 27, 2018 offers details on relevant issues and background
Comment
A recent report by Nunavut Tunngavit Inc. estimates lost wages to Nunavut Inuit in government work forces to be $1.284B from 2017-2023. The report also estimates unnecessary costs over the same period to be $519M. The Government of Nunavut workforce has been stalled at an approximately 50% Inuit participation rate, concentrated at lower pay grades, while Federal Government work force is at an even lower level. The Nunavut Inuit Labor Force Analysis (NILFA) is a thorough 1000-page report that analyzes Inuit interest, availability and preparedness for government employment. 
Potential Solution
http://files.tunngavik.com:8080/?

The Council of The Federation, bi-annual meetings of the Federal, Provincial and Territory Premiers for excluding national Indigenous organizations from participating in formal part of meeting

Why?
July 17, 2017 – Some of the leaders are opposed to indigenous groups participating in federal-provincial-territorial intergovernmental tables, including the 2017 Council of the Federation meeting scheduled for Edmonton July 18 and 19, 2017. Assembly of First Nations, Métis National Council and Inuit Tapariit Kanatami also skipped the 2018 meetings. (CBC)
Comment
The Council of the Federation, established in 2003, enables Canada’s 13 provincial and territorial leaders to work collaboratively and strengthen the Canadian federation by fostering a constructive relationship among provinces and territories and with the federal government. Leaders of the AFN, the Métis National Council, the Inuit Tapariit Kanatami chose not to attend the meeting because of the regressive moves by some members of the Council to minimize and marginalize participation of Indigenous leaders. 
Potential Solution
July 8, 2019 – The leaders of the Assembly of First Nations, Métis National Council, Inuit Tapariit Kanatami and the Native Women’s Association of Canada have all agreed to meet at Big River First Nation in Saskatchewan the day before the Council of Federation meeting in Saskatoon to discuss priorities and considerations for “Bill C-92, An Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and familiesAll four leaders – Perry Bellegarde, AFN; Clement Chartrand, Métis National Council; Naten Obed, Inuit Tapariit Kanatami and Interim President Gail Paul, NWAC) – have emphasized over and over that they must be included in all meetings and discussions on any issues that impact Indigenous peoples. – including the Council of Ministers. 

Federal Government for excluding Native Woman’s Association of Canada in national discussions with other Indigenous groups

Why?
July, 2017 – Failure to include the Native Woman’s Association of Canada (NWAC) – the national advocacy group for native women – in national discussions involving indigenous people. This sex-based discrimination minimizes the voice of the women and girls NWAC represents.
Comment
NWAC has been excluded from the most recent First Ministers meeting in Oct. 2017 as well as December 2016 and March 2016. In addition, NWAC was not invited to the reconciliation meeting with the PMO in December 2016 nor to any of the over 100 engagement sessions on the Federal Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Framework.
Potential Solution
Feb. 1, 2019 – With the common goals of establishing a renewed Nation-to-Nation relationship between Indigenous Nations and Canada, the Government of Canada and the Native Women’s Association signed an Accord on February 1, 2019. The Accord will recognize as a full participant in decision-making processes at the national and international levels. This Accord means Canada will work with to establish a reconciliation building process to decolonize, which includes meetings with the Prime Minister, Ministers, Deputy Ministers responsible for policy development and key federal Cabinet Ministers. For too long, the voices of Indigenous women, girls and gender diverse people have been silenced. Through this Accord, their perspectives and political voices will be heard and will assist the development and design process of programs, services, policies and laws.
Feb. 25, 2019 – Discussions with Prime Minister Trudeau, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations Carolyn Bennett, Minister of Indigenous Services Seamus O’Regan, and Minister for Women and Gender Equality Maryam Monsef included the implementation of the Canada-NWAC Accord and the importance of our participation in the development of all policies, programs, and legislation to ensure a culturally-relevant gender based lens is applied. NWAC’s leadership and expertise ensures the specific and necessary inclusion of Indigenous women, girls, and gender diverse people.

Federal Government for taking 5 years to respond to the Qikiqtani Truth Commission Final report and its twenty-five recommendations

Why?
April, 2014 – Failure to implement recommendations or provide progress reports on implementation of the Qikiqtani Truth Commission. The Commission was charged to begin a broader truth and reconciliation process to promote healing for those who suffered historic wrongs, and heal relations between Inuit and governments by providing an opportunity for acknowledgement and forgiveness. Qikiqtani Inuit are seeking saimaqatigiingniq, which means a new relationship “when past opponents get back together, meet in the middle, and are at peace.”
Comment
Oct. 8, 2016 The intergenerational trauma associated with the slaughter of sled dogs and the forced movement of Inuit from seasonal camps to permanent settlements still lingers in communities across Nunavut’s Baffin region.  But the Inuit who endured long periods of poverty and separation from family members say they are ready to forgive. Nearly three years ago, the Qikiqtani Truth Commission published a final report on what Inuit experienced from 1950 to 1975, when Inuit were compelled to leave their seasonal camps and settle in communities when government policies aimed “to make the North more like the South and Inuit more like Southern Canadians. The federal government has been extremely slow in responding to the recommendations. (CBC)
Potential Solution
August 14, 2019 – The Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations delivered an official apology on behalf of the Government of Canada to the Qikiqtani Inuit for the Government’s actions in the Qikiqtani region between 1950 and 1975. To move forward, Minister Bennett announced that Canada and the Qikiqtani Inuit Association (QIA) have established a Memorandum of Understanding to work in partnership to build a long-term and sustainable response to the Qikiqtani Truth Commission’s findings. This includes identified funding to implement programming for Qikiqtani Inuit to promote Inuit culture, healing and well-being for current and future generations.
Jan. 31, 2019 – Qikiqtani Inuit Association (QIA) releases ‘Action on the Qikiqtani Truth Commission’ report which sets out a plan for a formal acknowledgement, apology and action on the recommendations outlined in the Qikiqtani Truth Commission. Specifically, QIA is seeking a three-fold commitment from Canada, to be negotiated and concluded as soon as possible.
·       A formal acknowledgement and apology
·       A Memorandum of Understanding to establish the Saimaqatigiingniq Fund
·       Commencement of Inuit history and empowerment programs and initiatives
https://www.qia.ca/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/QIA-QTC-English_FINAL-LobbyingKit-2019-06-13_LOW.pdf
https://www.qtcommission.ca/sites/default/files/public/thematic_reports/thematic_reports_english_final_report.pdf

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