Indigenous Success Stories

Deepening Knowledge Project: OISE’s Aboriginal Peoples Curricula Database

Why?
Jan. 4, 2019 – The Deepening Knowledge Project seeks to infuse Aboriginal peoples’ histories, knowledges and pedagogies into all levels of education in Canada.  The project is a part of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, which is located on the territories of Anishinaabe and Onkwehonwe peoples.
http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/deepeningknowledge/
Comment
On this site you’ll find information about the history and traditions of First Nations, Métis, Inuit and Native American cultures, information about the challenges facing Aboriginal communities today, and curricula for incorporating this information into your teaching practice organized by grade, subject, and theme. Find lessons and links to help support your classroom learning through ideas, lesson templates, and links to books, films, and music to bring Indigenous perspectives, knowledges, and stories into your classroom

Four Maskwacîs Cree Nations in Alberta

Why?
May 15, 2018 – Maskwacîs Education Schools Commission Resource and Development Agreement—which includes signatories from the Chiefs of each of the four Maskwacîs Cree Nations and Canada’s Minister of Indigenous Services – marks the official transition of true local control of education to the Maskwacis Cree
Comment
Maskwacîs Education Schools Commission (MESC) is the new education authority for all 11 schools and two Head Start programs in Maskwacîs. The primary goal of MESC is improving educational opportunities, services and student success for all students who attend our schools in Maskwacis

Anishinabek Nation and the Federal Government

Why?
Aug. 16, 2017 – The federal government has signed a self-governance agreement “Anishinabek Nation Education Agreement” with 23 Ontario First Nations, the largest such deal of its kind in Canada. 
Oct. 2, 2018 – The Kinoomaadziwin Education Body (KEB) opens the doors of its new head office location (Nipissing First Nation) to the public today, at the official launch of the Anishinabek Education System (AES).
Comment
The agreement grants communities greater control over education on reserve from JK – Grade 12. It also allows First Nations to wield more administrative control of funding for post-secondary education and supports the Anishinabek Nation’s vision of a quality Anishinabek Education System that promotes Anishinaabe culture and language and improves education outcomes for Anishinabek students.

Chief Whitecap School, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Why?
Sept. 2014 – The elementary school is part of a unique partnership between Whitecap Dakota First Nation, Saskatoon Public Schools and the federal and provincial governments that includes students in Grades 5-8 from Whitecap and K-8 students from Stonebridge
Comment
The first on–reserve school (for about 850 students at full capacity) to be integrated into a Saskatchewan School Division. Federal Government committed $2.7M as part of the construction.

Waywayseecappo First Nation in Manitoba

Why?
Aug. 8, 2012 – Macleans) Provincial and federal governments allowed First Nations to join the local school board, transforming indigenous students into provincial students. Under the agreement, the feds matched the provincial standard dollar for dollar. 
Comment
The extra $1.2M in annual funding allowed the school to hire 6 more teachers, reduce class size by 50% and raised teacher salaries between 13K – $18K to be in line with provincial peers.

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